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The Wildlands Network Blog

The Red Fox: Connectivity for Cunning Creatures

In this second blog post in a new series of wildlife profiles, we’re exploring the cunning red fox, one subspecies of which is in danger of disappearing from the American landscape forever. Read on to learn more about how Wildlands Network’s efforts to reestablish habitat connectivity across North America can benefit species like the red fox. Photo: Lisa Hupp, USFWS

Studying Elk Movements in Southern Appalachia

On April 11th, we completed the deployment of our 11 elk GPS collars with wildlife biologist Justin McVey and other North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission staff. We will use the elk’s movement data from the GPS collars to identify road crossing locations and the impacts of roads on elk movement to improve wildlife connectivity and human safety in southern Appalachia. Photo: Liz Hillard

Achieving Shared Goals: New U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan Affirms Wildlands Network’s Conservation Strategy

On April 24, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the final Jaguar Recovery Plan. Many of the recovery actions proposed in the plan reaffirm Wildlands Network’s key strategies for protecting and enhancing jaguar populations in Mexico and the U.S., while also demonstrating the need for continued robust advocacy with government officials to improve and strengthen the official recovery programs. Photo: © milosk50 / Adobe Stock

American Martens Can Thrive in Protected and Connected Habitats

In this first blog post in a new series, we’re taking a closer look at American martens, who are integral in developing well-balanced forest communities and will greatly benefit from connected and protected habitats. Wildlands Network is actively working to increase habitat connectivity for this special creature in regions like the Pacific. Photo: Erwin and Peggy Bauer

Can We Preserve the Grand Canyon’s History and Wilderness for the Next 10,000 Years?

After a thrilling rafting trip down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, Rebecca Hunter wrote about her journey through one of America’s most prized national treasures. At Wildlands Network, large protected areas like Grand Canyon National Park and other public lands form the building blocks of our Wildways, and it’s imperative that we continue to protect such regions, now and into the future. Photo: Richard Forbes

Close-up of gray, white, and tan dog-like animal with tongue hanging out.

There Was Actually a Study to Determine If Red Wolves Are Wolves. The Answer Could Have Doomed Them.

The Washington Post quoted Dr. Ron Sutherland on the recently released report that classified red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves qualify for protections under the Endangered Species Act. We are hopeful this report will motivate the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reinvigorate their red wolf recovery efforts. Photo: USFWS

Lone pronghorn walking through a meadow of yellow flowers

Border Construction Concerns Conservation Groups, Wildlife Experts

KVOA, a local news station in Tucson, Arizona, interviewed our borderlands coordinator, Myles Traphagen, about the Pentagon’s recent transfer of $1 billion to build the border wall in Arizona, California, and New Mexico. If such a wall is built, it will facilitate an ecological disaster, cutting off iconic species who call both the U.S. and Continue reading “Border Construction Concerns Conservation Groups, Wildlife Experts”

Red wolf walking towards the photographer with tongue hanging out.

Endangered Red Wolves Are a Distinct Species in Northeastern North Carolina, According to New Study

The Virginian-Pilot covered our response to the newly released wolf taxonomy report, which declared red wolves to be a genetically distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves deserve protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Steve Hillebrand, USFWS

Government-Funded Study Says Red Wolves Are Distinct Species

Dr. Ron Sutherland, our chief scientist, spoke with the Washington Post about the newly released expert report that defines red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. This conclusion is especially important because it means that as a distinct species, red wolves are deserving of protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Ron Sutherland