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The Wildlands Network Blog

The mission of Wildlands Network is to reconnect, restore, and rewild North America so that life in all its diversity can thrive. Tune into The Wildlands Network Blog for updates about our campaigns, policy work, events, news stories—and as the go-to resource for rewilding North America.

Can We Preserve the Grand Canyon’s History and Wilderness for the Next 10,000 Years?

After a thrilling rafting trip down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, Rebecca Hunter wrote about her journey through one of America’s most prized national treasures. At Wildlands Network, large protected areas like Grand Canyon National Park and other public lands form the building blocks of our Wildways, and it’s imperative that we continue to protect such regions, now and into the future. Photo: Richard Forbes

Close-up of gray, white, and tan dog-like animal with tongue hanging out.

There Was Actually a Study to Determine If Red Wolves Are Wolves. The Answer Could Have Doomed Them.

The Washington Post quoted Dr. Ron Sutherland on the recently released report that classified red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves qualify for protections under the Endangered Species Act. We are hopeful this report will motivate the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reinvigorate their red wolf recovery efforts. Photo: USFWS

Red wolf walking towards the photographer with tongue hanging out.

Endangered Red Wolves Are a Distinct Species in Northeastern North Carolina, According to New Study

The Virginian-Pilot covered our response to the newly released wolf taxonomy report, which declared red wolves to be a genetically distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves deserve protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Steve Hillebrand, USFWS

Government-Funded Study Says Red Wolves Are Distinct Species

Dr. Ron Sutherland, our chief scientist, spoke with the Washington Post about the newly released expert report that defines red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. This conclusion is especially important because it means that as a distinct species, red wolves are deserving of protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Ron Sutherland

We Wall Ourselves Off: Response to Pentagon Allocating $1 billion for Border Fencing

On Tuesday, the Department of Defense, in response to a directive issued by President Trump, announced that it was transferring $1 billion U.S. dollars to build Trump’s unnecessary and destructive border wall.Wildlands Network strongly opposes the construction of a border wall. The building of such a structure in southern Arizona and New Mexico would be an ecological disaster with far reaching implications. Photo: Tom Koerner, USFWS

Native Grasses of the Apache Highlands: An Interview with Artist Matilda Essig

In the world of conservation, grasslands usually take a back seat to mountains and forests. But at the Tucson International Airport, grasses take center stage in larger-than-life prints in artist Matilda Essig’s exhibit. Our borderlands coordinator, Myles Traphagen, sat down with Matilda for an interview on the critical role grasses play in healthy ecosystems. Photo: Myles Traphagen

Small wild canid with pointy ears and fuzzy tan coat

No Harm Done

Published in our Summer 1993 issue of Wild Earth Journal, Mollie Matteson’s haunting essay on the perils of extreme interference with the natural world paints a dark picture of a possible future with unexpected, insidious consequences. Photo: William C. Gladish

A close-up of a large jaguar walking through the desert under a bright blue sky

Catalyst: Wildlife Migration Corridors

In this video, Arizona PBS discusses the benefits of and obstacles to strengthening wildlife corridors in the borderlands region of the U.S. and Mexico with Juan Carlos Bravo, director of our Mexico Program. The video also features our friends in the Sonoran Desert, Rancho El Aribabi, the owners of which prioritize conservation in their land management, aiding in the recovery and migration of vulnerable species like the jaguar. Photo: Northern Jaguar Project/Naturalia