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Studying Elk Movements in Southern Appalachia

On April 11th, we completed the deployment of our 11 elk GPS collars with wildlife biologist Justin McVey and other North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission staff. We will use the elk’s movement data from the GPS collars to identify road crossing locations and the impacts of roads on elk movement to improve wildlife connectivity and human safety in southern Appalachia. Photo: Liz Hillard

Five people tend to a bull elk whose face is covered with a green cloth.

Making Roads Safer for Wildlife and People with GPS Elk Collars

Since fitting 3 elk with GPS collars 8 months ago near Great Smoky Mountains National Park, we’ve collared 4 more elk and are continuing to monitor their movements across nearby roadways to potentially reduce dangerous wildlife-vehicle collisions. We’ll use the data from the GPS collars to recommend the best places for wildlife crossings on roadways surrounding the park, protecting both wildlife and people. Photo: Keith Martin