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Why Florida Panthers Need a National Wildlife Corridors System

Through the implementation of wildlife corridors and road crossings on major highways, Florida Panthers would have a safe passage from southern protected areas such as Big Cypress National Preserve, Everglades National Park, and Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge northward to protected areas like Apalachicola National Forest, securing this species for future generations. Florida Panthers are a classic tale of an American comeback—and by supporting the National Wildlife Corridors Bill, this species will continue to represent this important national story.

Four Species on the Brink

This report summarizes the most relevant and up-to-date information on four charismatic species affected by the fragmentation of habitat and disruption of movement corridors resulting from the existing and proposed border infrastructure and associated militarization. It focuses on the Arizona-Sonora border and covers a small portion of western New Mexico’s border with Chihuahua, but its framework and broad themes are relevant to any evaluation of impacts to wildlife across the entire U.S.-Mexico border.

Jaguar Draft Recovery Plan

The jaguar is listed as endangered throughout its range under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA), as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Historically, the jaguar inhabited 21 countries throughout the Americas, from the U.S. south into Argentina. Currently, jaguars are found in 19 countries: Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, United States (U.S.), and Venezuela. The species is believed to be extirpated from El Salvador and Uruguay. The goal of this revised recovery plan is to recover and delist the jaguar, with downlisting from endangered to threatened status as an intermediate goal.

Florida Panther Recovery Plan, USFWS, Third Revision

The Florida panther is the last subspecies of Puma still surviving in the eastern United States. Historically occurring throughout the southeastern United States, today the panther is restricted to less than 5% of its historic range in one breeding population located in south Florida. The goal of this recovery plan is to achieve long-term viability of the Florida panther to a point where it can be reclassified from endangered to threatened, and then removed from the Federal List of endangered and threatened species.