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Mining in Natural Protected Areas in Mexico

Natural Protected Areas (NPAs) serve as spaces for conserving biodiversity, preserving ecosystems and ensuring essential environmental services for all living beings. In Mexico, mining activities within NPAs are supported by law. The Mining Law establishes the dominance of mineral extraction over any productive activity or land use; this endangers the integrity of Mexico’s natural heritage. 

Fuera Minería de las Areas Naturales Protegidas

Las Áreas Naturales Protegidas (ANP) son espacios únicos que nos permiten conservar la biodiversidad, preservar los ecosistemas y, garantizar servicios ambientales indispensables para todos los seres vivos. En México las actividades mineras dentro de en las ANP están amparadas por las leyes. En la Ley Minera se establece la preponderancia de la extracción de minerales por encima de cualquier actividad productiva o uso de suelo; esto pone en peligro la integridad de nuestro patrimonio natural.

A Mosaic of Land Tenure and Ownership Creates Challenges and Opportunities for Transboundary Conservation in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

This case study demonstrates how a diversity of social, political, and economic forces in border regions can create unique pressures on wildlife habitat. Conservation of landscapes that host a wide range of land uses, jurisdictions, and competing for management goals can be challenging, especially when considering habitat needs of wide-ranging species. However, there are unique Continue reading “A Mosaic of Land Tenure and Ownership Creates Challenges and Opportunities for Transboundary Conservation in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands”

Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act Fact Sheet 2019

Many species in the US are declining. Scientists estimate that one in five species are at risk of extinction. One of the greatest threats to species survival and diversity is the loss, degradation, and fragmentation of natural habitats. America’s landscapes are losing species, becoming biologically unproductive and unhealthy because native habitats have become islands, cutoff from other landscapes and waterways, unable to sustain vital natural processes, such as: dispersal, migration, genetic exchange, acquisition of resources, population stability, and climate adaptation, among others.

Western Wildway Newsletter August 2018

The Western Wildway Newsletter collects some of the news and accomplishments from our partners around the Wildway. This edition from August 2018 includes stories about the Forest Service’s intention of giving the Village at Wolf Creek road access, The Wilderness Society’s work to secure the Land and Water Conservation Fund, and the reintroduction of the Wildlife Corridor Conservation Act in Congress.

Western Wildway Highlights June 2018

The Western Wildway Highlights Newsletter collects some of the news and accomplishments from our partners around the Wildway. This edition from June 2018 includes stories about the importance of public lands for Mexican wolf recovery, the launch of Rocky Mountain Wild’s I-70 audio tour, and the protection of Iconic Castle Parks in Alberta.

Notice of Intent to Sue for Violating the Endangered Species Act When Issuing a Final Recovery Plan for the Mexican wolf

The Western Environmental Law Center provided this notice of intent to sue the federal government for violating the Endangered Species Act in its final Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, on behalf of WildEarth Guardians (“Guardians”), Western Watersheds Project (“WWP”), Wildlands Network, and the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. Guardians, WWP, Wildlands Network, and the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance have significant, concrete interests in ensuring the long-term survival and recovery of Mexican wolves in the contiguous United States and ensuring the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (“the Service”) utilizes the best available science and complies with the ESA when preparing a recovery plan for the Mexican wolf.

Why Pronghorn Need a National Wildlife Corridors System

Each winter, pronghorn make a grueling, 150-mile migration from Wyoming’s Upper Green River Basin to Grand Teton National Park. Without this migration, pronghorns would not be able to find feeding grounds to get them through such harsh winters. Unfortunately, many of our roads, fences, and cities block pronghorns from making this critical migration. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act would make it possible for pronghorn to reclaim their migration route and secure it for future generations.