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Why Monarch Butterflies Need a National Wildlife Corridors System

Many consider the monarch butterfly to be one of the most beautiful butterflies in the world. What some people may not know is that, each year, monarchs travel 2,500 miles to Mexico and southern California to escape freezing temperatures and lack of food during the winter. Through the designation of a National Wildlife Corridors System, we can support monarchs by protecting strategic habitat along their flyways, thus providing them with necessary resting areas, food, and the ability to reproduce.

Why Grizzly Bears Need a National Wildlife Corridors System

Grizzly bears don’t follow human boundaries, and often, our parks are simply too small for this wide-ranging species. Just like how people need highways to get from one place to another safely, grizzly bears and other species need wildlife corridors to move from protected area to protected area in search of food and mates. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act would provide these essential paths—protecting grizzlies and drivers from dangerous wildlife-vehicle collisions, and helping to reduce conflicts with people by giving grizzlies a safer route around cities and towns.

Why Pronghorn Need a National Wildlife Corridors System

Each winter, pronghorn make a grueling, 150-mile migration from Wyoming’s Upper Green River Basin to Grand Teton National Park. Without this migration, pronghorns would not be able to find feeding grounds to get them through such harsh winters. Unfortunately, many of our roads, fences, and cities block pronghorns from making this critical migration. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act would make it possible for pronghorn to reclaim their migration route and secure it for future generations.

Information Packet: Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act

This bill would establish the National Wildlife Corridors System to provide for the protection and restoration of native fish, wildlife, and plant species. The conservation of landscape corridors and waterways, where native species and ecological processes can transition from one habitat to another, is critical to conserving biodiversity and ensuring resiliency for wildlife—especially in the face of climate change. Read case studies about how this act would benefit Florida panthers, grizzly bears, monarch butterflies, and pronghorns.

Four Species on the Brink

This report summarizes the most relevant and up-to-date information on four charismatic species affected by the fragmentation of habitat and disruption of movement corridors resulting from the existing and proposed border infrastructure and associated militarization. It focuses on the Arizona-Sonora border and covers a small portion of western New Mexico’s border with Chihuahua, but its framework and broad themes are relevant to any evaluation of impacts to wildlife across the entire U.S.-Mexico border.

Mexican Wolf Comments to USFWS from Wildlands Network

Wildlands Network responds to the USFWS’s draft plan for Mexican wolf recovery: Our immediate concern is the draft plan falls far short of the mark needed for recovery of these critically endangered wolves, and that these shortcomings are driven by politics rather than the science of wolf recovery. If implemented, it would allow fewer than half the number of wolves in the wild that most of the previous recovery team scientists say are needed in the U.S. for recovery—with another small isolated population in Mexico—at which time the states would assume full management responsibility for Lobo survival. The prospect of premature downlisting and delisting, exacerbated by the relevant states’ record opposing wolf recovery discussed below, affords a recipe for extinction—not recovery— for one of the most critically endangered wild mammals in North America.

Group Sign-On Letter: Oppose H.R. 3219 Security Minibus – Vote No on Border Wall

Wildlands Network signed on to this letter to the U.S. House of Representatives, urging them to vote no on funding for the continued construction of the border wall. Not only is the wall an ineffective tool at managing border migration, it will also irreparably harm biodiversity in the Rio Grande Valley. Nearly 90 environmental, faith, immigration, and civil rights organizations signed on to the letter opposing the border wall.

Potential Jaguar Habitat and Structural Connectivity in and Surrounding the Northwestern Recovery Unit

The goal of this work was to map habitat and connectivity for jaguars (Panthera onca) in southern Arizona and the Northwestern Recovery Unit (NRU) study area. To do this, we followed the general approach outlined by Sanderson and Fisher (2011; 2013) but updated it using finer-grained spatial data and a gradient-based (rather than binary habitat/non-habitat) model using the same observational data on jaguars.

Wildlands Network Comments on the Jaguar Draft Recovery Plan

These comments were written in response to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s jaguar draft recovery plan, for which the notice of availability and request for comments was published in the Federal Register on December 20, 2016. As a continental conservation organization, Wildlands Network has an interest in the recovery of jaguars and the protection of jaguar habitat in both the United States and Mexico.

Borderlands Connectivity Report

In recent years, Mexican agencies, non-profit groups, and academia have all made efforts to better address connectivity needs in the borderlands region of Sonora and northeastern Chihuahua. Some actions have focused on identifying impacts of U.S. border infrastructure, others have advanced protected area regulations, while still others seek to reduce habitat fragmentation generated by roads with a focus on Highway 2.

This report is our first effort to put some of the information resulting from regulatory actions, wildlife-friendly infrastructure, and research activities, into a series of maps that allows us to identify areas of the highest immediate concern for connectivity along the U.S. border with Sonora and northwestern Chihuahua. Geographically explicit data are not as readily available as literature, so this effort cannot contain all existing research, nor does it cover all fauna impacted by the border wall. Rather, the report focuses on a few wide-ranging species for which data could be readily collected.

Public Lands Planning Details

To complement Wildlands Network’s Public Lands Planning Atlas, this spreadsheet provides further detail on active connectivity land use planning opportunities with the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Jaguar Draft Recovery Plan

The jaguar is listed as endangered throughout its range under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA), as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Historically, the jaguar inhabited 21 countries throughout the Americas, from the U.S. south into Argentina. Currently, jaguars are found in 19 countries: Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, United States (U.S.), and Venezuela. The species is believed to be extirpated from El Salvador and Uruguay. The goal of this revised recovery plan is to recover and delist the jaguar, with downlisting from endangered to threatened status as an intermediate goal.

Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument Fact Sheet

Made up of public lands surrounding Grand Canyon, the proposed Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument is a magnificent landscape held dear by Native American Tribes, Arizonans, and Americans across the country. The area’s rugged cliffs, pine forests, deep canyons and grasslands protect and provide clean drinking water for this parched region and for millions of people downstream who depend on the Colorado River.

Western Wildway Public Lands Planning Atlas

This interactive map identifies public lands planning areas with opportunities for advancing the protection of wildlife corridors along the U.S. portion of the 6,000-mile Western Wildway.

Proposed Zion Black-Mountain and Bull Valley-Mountain Home Wildlife Corridor ACECs

The Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA) directs BLM to “give priority to the designation and protection of areas of critical environmental concern (ACECs)” that require “special management attention…to protect and prevent irreparable damage to important historic, cultural, or scenic values, fish and wildlife resources or other natural systems or processes,” or to protect people from natural hazards.