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Eastern Wildway Highlights September 2018

The Eastern Wildway Highlights Newsletter collects some of the news and accomplishments from our partners around the Wildway. This edition from September 2018 includes stories about the USFWS plan to reduce the recovery area for red wolves, the growing movement to expand and protect the Florida Wildlife Corridor, and the halted construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

Eastern Wildway Newsletter May 2018

The Eastern Wildway Newsletter collects some of the news and accomplishments from our partners around the Wildway. This edition from May 2018 includes stories about the cost of protecting the remaining caribou in Quebec, the protection of a piece of the Shawangunk Ridge, and the five year review of the Red Wolf Recovery Program.

Eastern Wildway Highlights May 2018

The Eastern Wildway Highlights Newsletter collects some of the news and accomplishments from our partners around the Wildway. This edition from May 2018 includes stories about elk collaring in Great Smokey Mountains National Park, stopping the construction of pipelines, and galvanizing support for local wildlife corridors through storytelling.

Why Florida Panthers Need a National Wildlife Corridors System

Through the implementation of wildlife corridors and road crossings on major highways, Florida Panthers would have a safe passage from southern protected areas such as Big Cypress National Preserve, Everglades National Park, and Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge northward to protected areas like Apalachicola National Forest, securing this species for future generations. Florida Panthers are a classic tale of an American comeback—and by supporting the National Wildlife Corridors Bill, this species will continue to represent this important national story.

Information Packet: Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act

The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act would establish the National Wildlife Corridors System to provide for the protection and restoration of native fish, wildlife, and plant species. The conservation of landscape corridors and waterways, where native species and ecological processes can transition from one habitat to another, is critical to conserving biodiversity and ensuring resiliency for wildlife—especially in the face of climate change. Read case studies about how this act would benefit Florida panthers, grizzly bears, monarch butterflies, and pronghorns.

Florida Panther Comments to USFWS from Wildlands Network

Wildlands Network responds to the USFWS’s 5-year review of the Florida panther’s endangered status: The Florida panther’s recent population growth in south Florida is encouraging, and almost certainly speaks to the genetic rescue effect generated by introduction of cougars from Texas. However, urban development continues to quickly erode prime Florida panther habitat across Florida and in other southeastern states as well. This unmitigated pattern of urban development across the region is one of several signals that the current efforts to recover the panther are inadequate for achieving the goal of recovering the Florida panther to the point where it is no longer threatened with extinction in the wild.

Red Wolf Comments to the USFWS from Wildlands Network

In these comments submitted to the USFWS, Wildlands Network’s Dr. Ron Sutherland outlines the flaws in the agency’s plan to reduce wild red wolves to a small patch of federal land in Dare County, North Carolina. Ron lays out Wildlands Network’s recommendations to combat the plan’s flawed science, including maintaining the wild red wolf population, understanding the critical ramifications of gunshot mortality for the red wolves, and not limiting the wolves to captive population. We submitted these comments to the USFWS during the open comment period for their plan to reduce the wild red wolf population.