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This 3-D model shows a wildlife bridge connecting two wild areas over a highway.

Chihuahua Approves Wildlife Crossings on Highways

Last week, the state of Chihuahua in Mexico amended a law to mandate wildlife crossings on all new highway projects in the state. Wildlife crossings decrease the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions, protecting both wildlife and human travelers. Huffington Post Mexico covered the story, interviewing Juan Carlos Bravo, our Mexico Program Director. Graphic: Pedro Capdeveille

This 3-D model shows a wildlife bridge connecting two wild areas over a highway.

Diputados locales de Chihuahua aprueban reforma que exige Pasos de Fauna en todos los nuevos proyectos de carreteras del estado

El lunes, diputados locales del estado de Chihuahua, aprobaron un reforma a la Ley de Transporte y sus Vías de Comunicación que obliga a implementar Pasos de Fauna en el diseño, construcción y mantenimiento de caminos y carreteras para conservar los movimientos de la vida silvestre. Gráfico: Pedro Capdeveille

This 3-D model shows a wildlife bridge connecting two wild areas over a highway.

Chihuahua State Representatives Pass Amendment Requiring Wildlife Crossings on All New Highway Projects in the State

Representatives of the northern state of Chihuahua in Mexico recently approved an amendment in the state’s Transportation Law requiring the implementation of wildlife crossings in the design, construction and maintenance of roads and highways for preserving wildlife movements. Graphic: Pedro Capdeveille

Un vistazo de vida silvestre en movimiento

La Carretera 2 de México podría crear una barrera geográfica casi impasable para la vida silvestre que trata de cruzarla para encontrar comida, compañeros y refugio. Leer más sobre la captura de cámaras que estamos realizando en esta área para hacer recomendaciones basadas en datos para cruces de vida silvestre a lo largo de la carretera. Foto: Wildlands Network/EcoGrande/Sky Island Alliance

A large tan cat walks on a white, pebbly shore near water.

2018 Year in Review: Building Quiet Momentum

From field research to introducing wildlife corridor protections in Congress to creating new collaborative partnerships, we’ve worked harder than ever—sometimes stressed, sometimes angered, and often exhausted—but always resolute and hopeful. We invite you to take a look at this reflection of our work for wildlife and wildlands in 2018. Photo: National Park Service

A group of tan and white four-legged animals stand in a line looking at the camera in a yellow, grassy field in front of some mountains in the evening light.

Landmark Legislation to Protect Wildlife Corridors Introduced in the Senate and House

The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act was introduced today by Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). If passed, the Act will be a major victory for wildlife and wildlands across the country, restoring habitat and protecting America’s native wildlife by establishing a National Wildlife Corridors Program. Photo: Chip Carroon, BLM

A hand holds a hat detailed with an circular image of a canyon, skies, and water, and the words "Bears Ears."

Canyon Rumbles

Wildways trekker John Davis reflects on his time at RumbleX, Wildlands Network’s annual Conservation in Motion gathering of outdoor athletes. This year, conservation athletes, naturalists, and activists gathered at Bears Ears National Monument to explore and defend its wildness after President Trump illegally shrunk its boundaries. Photo: Courtesy of Kahtoola