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John Davis bikes with a pack raft strapped to his back. Some text appears next to Davis that says "Official Selection, Flagstaff Mountain Film Festival."

Born to Rewild Film Screening in Salt Lake City

Join WN staff and members of the conservation and outdoor recreation communities for a screening of Born to Rewild, a film that follows WN’s own John Davis on his 5,000-mile trek from Mexico to Canada. This event is free and open to the public.

3 male hikers walking beside a river with red canyon walls in the background

Born to Rewild Showing at Flagstaff Mountain Film Festival

Follow ultra trekker John Davis on his 8-month journey as he hikes, bikes, and paddles 5,000 miles from Mexico to Canada to bring awareness to the obstacles that wildlife faces as it tries to move from one area to another. His mission is to bring conservation groups, public land agencies, and private landowners together to create a continuous wildlife corridor across the spine of the continent. Photo: Kristen Caldon

Man with backpack hikes up a snowy mountainside with tall green trees and a mountain peak visible behind him.

Born to Rewild Film Premiere at Sedona International Film Festival

The feature film premiere of John Davis’ “TrekWest” 5,000-mile adventure from Mexico to Canada that captures the essence of the movement to put Conservation in Motion ™ and drives home the need to protect wildlife habitat connectivity across the continent. Photo: Karsten Heuer

Man with backpack hikes up a snowy mountainside with tall green trees and a mountain peak visible behind him.

New Film “Born to Rewild” Proves Need for Continental-Sized Western Wildlife Corridor

Wildlands Network proudly announced today that the feature film premiere of “Born to Rewild” will highlight the opening day of the prestigious Sedona International Film Festival on Saturday, February 18. The film follows the epic 2013 adventure of conservation trekker John Davis as he followed the traditional movement pathways of species needing “room to roam” along a 5,000-mile stretch of the Continental Divide. Photo: Karsten Heuer

This photo looks over the edge of a valley toward dusky mountains in the background.

Mogollon Meandering: Guns, Cows and Roads

This is the third part in a four-part series about John Davis’ trek around the Mogollon Rim in Arizona. “These are the three big factors that make the Mogollon Plateau dangerous as a wildlife corridor. On the third day of my little scouting trip, this dubious threesome made me glad I had only two legs, else I suspect I’d have been shot.” Photo: U.S. Forest Service, Coconino National Forest

Mogollon Meandering: Scouting Connections from Grand Canyon to Gila

This is the first part in a four-part series about John Davis’ trek around the Mogollon Rim in Arizona. “In TrekWest, we followed the Mogollon Plateau and Rim much of the way between the Gila wildlands complex in southwest New Mexico and the Grand Canyon wildlands complex in northern Arizona. So important is this wildlife corridor that after the trek, Wildlands Network and partners placed it on our list of Top 20 wildlife connections in the Western Wildway.”

A man sits on a rocky ledge that juts out over a small waterfall. Green trees surround the scene in the background.

PaseoWILD 2015: Into Thick Thorns

This is the third installment in a three-part series about the second PaseoWILD expedition in September 2015. “Day 5: Habitat remained safe for a roaming cougar, as we advanced up Shinumo Creek, though prey was not abundantly evident. We saw no clear cougar tracks but a perfect cast of a bobcat track in dried mud enhanced the feline atmosphere, along with the occasional sign of bighorn sheep, rodents, and a ring-tailed “cat” (really, raccoon family) or two.” Photo: Kristen M. Caldon

A man with his back to the camera climbs over a boulder lining a narrow river.

PaseoWILD 2015: Up Shinumo Creek

This is the second installment in a three-part series about the second PaseoWILD expedition in September 2015. “Day 3: As we resumed waiting on the beach, Kristen espied sheep. Through binoculars, we watched four bighorn sheep, a big ram leading three ewes to water then back up into the safety (for these agile beasts!) of steep rocks.” Photo: Kristen M. Caldon