Section Menu
4 adorable brown and white pups sitting in the grass

The USFWS Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan Is a Plan for Extinction

Recently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a draft recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves. Wildlands Network has been preparing for this moment for a very long time. We expected to be disappointed by many of the components of the recovery plan, as well as its overall vision. Unfortunately, USFWS met our expectations. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo

Mountain Lions in Maine: Rewilding the Maine Woods

Join Wildlands Network’s own John Davis as he moderates a panel on rewilding the East for large carnivores, including the mountain lion, at the Damariscotta River Association’s Round Top Farm on June 28 at 7 p.m.

Two men packing a yellow inflatable raft next to a river

Daunted Courage, Part I

When writer Paula MacKay decided to join Wildlands friends on a float trip down the Upper Missouri River, she stepped out of her comfort zone and into the waterway traveled by Lewis and Clark more than 200 years ago. In Part I of her travel essay, she sets the stage for her paddle through history.

This wide, scenic shot shows tall trees in the foreground, a blanket of snow in the middle, and a lightly snow-powdered, tall mountain range rising up in the background against a blue sky.

Reserva Ajos-Bavispe re-categorizada

El año pasado, les hicimos saber que el estado de protección de la reserva Ajos-Bavispe se encontraba en un limbo burocrático desde hace muchos años. El lunes 22 de mayo la Secretaría del Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT) finalmente la re-categorizó, protegiendo así a la extraordinaria biodiversidad de está región de importancia central para la protección de jaguares, osos negros, lobos mexicanos, cotorras serranas occidentales y muchas otras especies prioritarias para la conservación. Foto: Mario Cirett

This wide, scenic shot shows tall trees in the foreground, a blanket of snow in the middle, and a lightly snow-powdered, tall mountain range rising up in the background against a blue sky.

Ajos-Bavispe Reserve Recategorized to Protected Area – Success!

Last year, we let you know the protected status of the Ajos-Bavispe reserve in the borderlands of Sonora had been in bureaucratic limbo for several years. On Monday, May 22, the Mexican government finally recategorized it, protecting the unique biodiversity of this core area for the protection of jaguars, black bears, Mexican wolves, thick-billed parrots and many other species listed in one or both countries along the border. Photo: Mario Cirett

Man with backpack hikes up a snowy mountainside with tall green trees and a mountain peak visible behind him.

Celebrating the Vision of the Western Wildway

Last Wednesday, May 17, Wildlands Network hosted two empowering events: the Salt Lake City premiere of the film Born to Rewild and the 2017 Western Wildway Annual Meeting. The near-tangible wonder and inspiration in the rooms after both events exemplify the spirit and opportunity within Wildlands Network’s critical conservation efforts. Photo: Karsten Heuer

A scenic panaroma of Bears Ears, with red canyonlands stretching into the distance underneath a blue sky filled with wispy clouds.

Defend Our National Monuments from President Trump

On April 26, President Trump signed an executive order instructing Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke to review all national monuments created since Jan. 1, 1996 and spanning at least 100,000 acres. This radical executive order, which allows for a sweeping review of 27 protected places, is an attack on all public lands. Now is the time to raise our voices and take action to protect these imperiled places and the wildlife relying on them for their existence. Photo: Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Mangagement

This 3-D model shows a wildlife bridge connecting two wild areas over a highway.

Your Money Will Fund the Border Wall

On May 3, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a budget to fund the federal government through the end of September 2017. The budget now moves to the Senate, with a looming deadline of Friday, May 5 at midnight for a vote. Some news outlets and Democrats have publically proclaimed this budget doesn’t include money for a border wall. They are wrong. Photo: Wildlands Network

A close-up of a large jaguar walking through the desert under a bright blue sky

Where Jaguars Roam, Revisited

Ever since a photograph of a lone wild jaguar in Arizona reverberated through the conservation community in 1996, wildlife experts in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands have been trying to determine where jaguars may continue to persist—and which corridors they might be using to disperse beyond their known stronghold in central Sonora. Just this month, researchers have made another significant stride in mapping potentially suitable jaguar habitat and corridors in the borderlands region. Photo: Northern Jaguar Project/Naturalia

A crowd of people march with signs, some of them reading "Wild Utah," in support of the March for Science in Salt Lake City.

Wildlands Network Marches for Science

On Earth Day, April 22, Wildlands Network staffers and friends gathered with thousands of citizens in Salt Lake City, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. to express support for science-based decision-making in conservation and policy. More specifically, we participated in the March for Science to support reason, fact, logic, and sound science as guiding principles in large-scale conservation work. Photo: Katie Davis

Large black bear with grass in foreground

Marching Forward for Science and the Wild

Wildlands Network remains committed to relying on science and facts to inform our work and conservation designs in North America. To the marchers who will stand and be counted on April 22nd on behalf of science, we salute you (and many of us will be joining you, too!). Keep marching, keep demonstrating, keep resisting, until we get our science-driven government back, and until the public fully realizes what is at stake. Photo: William C. Gladish

Mapping Connectivity at the Borderlands

The borderlands of the U.S. and Mexico are often misrepresented as deserted wastelands filled with contraband, dubious characters, and unwelcoming industrial cities. The essence of the borderlands region is far more complex, enriched not only by the mingling of diverse cultures, but also, notably, an astonishing diversity of life resulting from the merging of arctic and tropical climates in a convoluted topography.