Section Menu
Lone pronghorn walking through a meadow of yellow flowers

Biodiversity Days

Biodiversity Days are focused on cultivating awareness and promoting understanding as a key foundation for engagement, action and inspired care of our planet. This year’s theme is half earth. Photo: USFWS

3 male hikers walking beside a river with red canyon walls in the background

Born to Rewild Showing at Flagstaff Mountain Film Festival

Follow ultra trekker John Davis on his 8-month journey as he hikes, bikes, and paddles 5,000 miles from Mexico to Canada to bring awareness to the obstacles that wildlife faces as it tries to move from one area to another. His mission is to bring conservation groups, public land agencies, and private landowners together to create a continuous wildlife corridor across the spine of the continent. Photo: Kristen Caldon

John Davis hikes up a snowy mountainside with tall green trees and a mountain peak visible behind him.

Born to Rewild Film Premiere at Sedona International Film Festival

The feature film premiere of John Davis’ “TrekWest” 5,000-mile adventure from Mexico to Canada that captures the essence of the movement to put Conservation in Motion ™ and drives home the need to protect wildlife habitat connectivity across the continent. Photo: Karsten Heuer

John Davis hikes up a snowy mountainside with tall green trees and a mountain peak visible behind him.

New Film “Born to Rewild” Proves Need for Continental-Sized Western Wildlife Corridor

Wildlands Network proudly announced today that the feature film premiere of “Born to Rewild” will highlight the opening day of the prestigious Sedona International Film Festival on Saturday, February 18. The film follows the epic 2013 adventure of conservation trekker John Davis as he followed the traditional movement pathways of species needing “room to roam” along a 5,000-mile stretch of the Continental Divide. Photo: Karsten Heuer

Wildlands Network Supports Legislative Efforts to Prevent Wall Construction on U.S.-Mexico Border

Last Monday, Representative Adriano Espaillat (D-NY-13th) introduced the “This Land is Our Land Act,” which would prohibit new construction of border barriers on public lands managed by the Department of Agriculture or Department of Interior. On Thursday, Representative Michelle Lujan-Grisham (D-NM-1st) introduced the “Build Bridges Not Walls Act” in Congress, which would prohibit the implementation of President Trump’s recent executive order directing the construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Jaguar walking cautiously on a rocky dirt road

Trump Border Wall Plan Shows “Destructive Disregard” for Integrity of Borderlands Wildlife & Human Communities

“Existing fences along the U.S-Mexico border have already blocked or limited traditional paths for wildlife movement and migration necessary for the survival of the Southwest’s native animals, including America’s only known jaguars,” said Katie Davis, public lands advocate for international conservation organization Wildlands Network. Photo: Northern Jaguar Reserve and Naturalia

A dead coyote along the side of the road, with a truckload of people about to drive by

La Carretera Federal 2: ¿Fin del camino para jaguares y lobos?

El jaguar, especie emblemática y tercer felino de mayor tamaño en el mundo, se distribuye en México desde la península de Yucatán hasta el norte del estado fronterizo de Sonora, algunos individuos han llegado, en los últimos años, a cruzar la frontera hacia los Estados Unidos, tratando de recuperar su territorio en ese país, del que fueron exterminados en el siglo veinte. Foto: Jan Schipper

National Wildlife Corridor Legislation Introduced in House

U.S. Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA-8th) today introduced legislation to help protect and restore native wildlife and create more resilient landscapes across America. The bill, supported by nationally recognized scientists, including Harvard’s E.O. Wilson, and 64 prominent conservation organizations nationwide, grants authority to the Department of the Interior to collaborate with other key agencies, states, tribes and private landowners to develop a strategy for a wildlife corridor system. Photo: William C. Gladish