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A large tan cat walks on a white, pebbly shore near water.

2018 Year in Review: Building Quiet Momentum

From field research to introducing wildlife corridor protections in Congress to creating new collaborative partnerships, we’ve worked harder than ever—sometimes stressed, sometimes angered, and often exhausted—but always resolute and hopeful. We invite you to take a look at this reflection of our work for wildlife and wildlands in 2018. Photo: National Park Service

A small tan cat with black markings and yellow eyes stares at the camera.

Advocacy in the Digital Age: Using Technology to Defend the Wild

In this digital age, we have instant access to most of the lawmakers at every level of government. But how do you effectively engage with your lawmakers to discuss the environmental issues that affect us all? In the second post in our blog post series about environmental advocacy, you’ll learn how to engage your lawmakers through technology to speak up for wildlife and wildlands. Photo: Eric Kilby

A group of tan and white four-legged animals stand in a line looking at the camera in a yellow, grassy field in front of some mountains in the evening light.

Landmark Legislation to Protect Wildlife Corridors Introduced in the Senate and House

The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act was introduced today by Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). If passed, the Act will be a major victory for wildlife and wildlands across the country, restoring habitat and protecting America’s native wildlife by establishing a National Wildlife Corridors Program. Photo: Chip Carroon, BLM

A group of animals with orange and white hair stand in the middle and right of the frame, in a large grassy field.

Hope for the Future: The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act Will Soon Be Introduced

The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act will soon be reintroduced in Congress, and with growing bi-partisan support, it’s more likely than ever that we’ll see federally protected wildlife corridors across the United States. Take action for wildlife corridors today by asking your Senators and Representatives to cosponsor this critical legislation. Photo: Tom Koerner, USFWS

A small, fuzzy bear with black fur is pictured peering out from behind a tree branch.

Connected, Wild, and Free

In a time of increasing environmental uncertainty, Wildlands Network pursues an ambitious vision of a reconnected, rewilded and restored North America. But these audacious goals and our continental-scale programs come with a hefty price tag. Learn more about our annual fall fundraising campaign, and help us protect what we love for those we love. Photo: William C. Gladish

A brown, black and white wolf runs across the frame, toward the left of the frame. The wolf's front paws are off the ground and his tongue is out. He's running on dry scrubby ground.

Managing Public Lands to Restore the Mexican Wolf

While our lawsuit against the USFWS for their flawed Mexican wolf recovery plan works its way through the courts, there is plenty of work to do on the ground. Wildlands Network hopes to play a key role in these ongoing efforts by working with the Forest Service to design management strategies for public lands that will give Mexican wolves a better shot at recovery. Photo: Jim Clark, USFWS

Standing behind a fall tree trunk, a gray wolf looks toward the camera.

Wildlands Network and Other Conservationists Intend to File Lawsuit to Protect Mexican Wolves

Because the USFWS’s final Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, released last November, is not enough to ensure the recovery of the Mexican wolf, Wildlands Network gave the USFWS notice last year that we intended to file a lawsuit challenging the plan’s unscientific recommendations. The first piece of that lawsuit will be filed next week. Photo: Eric Kilby