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A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

Trump Administration Finalizes Deeply Flawed Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalized a deeply flawed recovery plan for the Mexican gray wolf. Responding to objections from state officials, the plan limits recovery efforts to south of Interstate 40 and sets population targets well below what federal scientists have determined are needed for Mexican gray wolves to be considered stable. Photo: Gary Kramer

4 adorable brown and white pups sitting in the grass

New Report Exposes Border Wall Threats to International Wildlife Conservation Efforts

A new report released today by Wildlands Network highlights how 4 wildlife species native to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands are critically imperiled by existing and proposed border wall construction. “Four Species on the Brink” summarizes habitat, population data, and bi-national conservation efforts for Sonoran pronghorn, black bear, jaguar and Mexican wolf. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo

A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

State and Federal Agency Justification for Limited Mexican Wolf Range Challenged by Preeminent Group of Scientists

A new letter written by eight internationally-respected scientific experts, published in this month’s Journal of Wildlife Management, directly challenges the information relied on by state and federal wildlife agencies to limit the recovery range for Mexican wolves in the United States. The newly published work provides significant evidence that the draft Mexican wolf recovery plan, released in June, requires revisions to be scientifically credible. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo

Woman in orange raincoat and lifejacket standing beside a yellow canoe next to a large river

Daunted Courage, Part III (Finale)

When writer Paula MacKay decided to join Wildlands friends on a float trip down the Upper Missouri River, she stepped out of her comfort zone and into the waterway traveled by Lewis and Clark more than 200 years ago. In the final section of her travel essay, she explores the rewards of river time and the challenges of being a conservationist. Photo: Robert Long

Closeup of a wolverine in the snow, showing large feet with long white claws.

For the Wild, 3: The Wildlands Vision, 1992

OUR VISION IS SIMPLE: we live for the day when Grizzly Bears in Chihuahua have an unbroken connection to Grizzlies in Alaska; when Gray Wolf populations are continuous from Mexico to Labrador; when vast unbroken forests and flowing plains again thrive and support pre-Columbian populations of plants and animals; when humans dwell with respect, harmony, and affection for the land; when we come to live no longer as strangers and aliens on this continent.