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Standing behind a fall tree trunk, a gray wolf looks toward the camera.

New Analysis Demonstrates Importance of Gila National Forest-Northern Arizona Wildlife Corridor for Mexican Wolf Recovery

Newly released maps conclusively demonstrate the importance of maintaining landscape connectivity between Northern Arizona and the Gila National Forest for Mexican wolf recovery. We hope wildlife agencies will use the new maps to maintain connectivity for native wildlife in the region. Photo: Eric Kilby

A brown, black and white wolf runs across the frame, toward the left of the frame. The wolf's front paws are off the ground and his tongue is out. He's running on dry scrubby ground.

Managing Public Lands to Restore the Mexican Wolf

While our lawsuit against the USFWS for their flawed Mexican wolf recovery plan works its way through the courts, there is plenty of work to do on the ground. Wildlands Network hopes to play a key role in these ongoing efforts by working with the Forest Service to design management strategies for public lands that will give Mexican wolves a better shot at recovery. Photo: Jim Clark, USFWS

Standing behind a fall tree trunk, a gray wolf looks toward the camera.

Wildlands Network and Other Conservationists Intend to File Lawsuit to Protect Mexican Wolves

Because the USFWS’s final Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, released last November, is not enough to ensure the recovery of the Mexican wolf, Wildlands Network gave the USFWS notice last year that we intended to file a lawsuit challenging the plan’s unscientific recommendations. The first piece of that lawsuit will be filed next week. Photo: Eric Kilby

A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

Trump Administration Finalizes Deeply Flawed Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalized a deeply flawed recovery plan for the Mexican gray wolf. Responding to objections from state officials, the plan limits recovery efforts to south of Interstate 40 and sets population targets well below what federal scientists have determined are needed for Mexican gray wolves to be considered stable. Photo: Gary Kramer

4 adorable brown and white pups sitting in the grass

New Report Exposes Border Wall Threats to International Wildlife Conservation Efforts

A new report released today by Wildlands Network highlights how 4 wildlife species native to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands are critically imperiled by existing and proposed border wall construction. “Four Species on the Brink” summarizes habitat, population data, and bi-national conservation efforts for Sonoran pronghorn, black bear, jaguar and Mexican wolf. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo

A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

State and Federal Agency Justification for Limited Mexican Wolf Range Challenged by Preeminent Group of Scientists

A new letter written by eight internationally-respected scientific experts, published in this month’s Journal of Wildlife Management, directly challenges the information relied on by state and federal wildlife agencies to limit the recovery range for Mexican wolves in the United States. The newly published work provides significant evidence that the draft Mexican wolf recovery plan, released in June, requires revisions to be scientifically credible. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo