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Promoting Wildlife-friendly Roads in Sonora, Mexico

Road ecology is a topic that is increasingly generating interest in society. Photographs and stories of wildlife crossings appear more frequently on social media and in press around the world, and legislators have presented bills in favor of these structures. This momentum was noticeable during the second Road Ecology Workshop, held on September 6 in Continue reading “Promoting Wildlife-friendly Roads in Sonora, Mexico”

A gray wolf raises its head in the air and howls.

Trump Administration Proposal to Remove Federal Protection for Gray Wolves is Scientifically and Legally Flawed

The Trump Administration is proposing stripping Endangered Species Act protection for all gray wolves in the lower 48 United States, except for the separately listed Mexican gray wolf. Comments on this proposal from conservation groups point to substantial flaws and omissions in the USFWS’s analysis of the relevant science and their interpretation of various ESA mandates. Photo: William C. Gladish

A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

Annual Mexican Wolf Count Shows Hope for the Species, but More Still Needs to Be Done

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (FWS) service reported earlier today that the Mexican gray wolf population had increased from 114 individuals in 2018 to 131 individuals in 2019. Kim Crumbo, Senior Carnivore Advocate for Wildlands Network, said that while the increase is good news, there is still much to be done to recover the endangered Mexican wolf to sustainable population levels. Wildlands Network encourages FWS to act upon the best available science for this species. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo

A gray wolf raises its head in the air and howls.

Wildlands Network Responds to Trump Administration’s Plan to Prematurely End Protections for Gray Wolves in Lower 48

In response to today’s announcement that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service intends to remove Endangered Species Act protections for most gray wolves in the lower 48 states, Wildlands Network’s senior carnivore advocate Kim Crumbo condemned the move as premature and not based on sound science. Photo: William C. Gladish

Standing behind a fall tree trunk, a gray wolf looks toward the camera.

New Analysis Demonstrates Importance of Gila National Forest-Northern Arizona Wildlife Corridor for Mexican Wolf Recovery

Newly released maps conclusively demonstrate the importance of maintaining landscape connectivity between Northern Arizona and the Gila National Forest for Mexican wolf recovery. We hope wildlife agencies will use the new maps to maintain connectivity for native wildlife in the region. Photo: Eric Kilby

A brown, black and white wolf runs across the frame, toward the left of the frame. The wolf's front paws are off the ground and his tongue is out. He's running on dry scrubby ground.

Managing Public Lands to Restore the Mexican Wolf

While our lawsuit against the USFWS for their flawed Mexican wolf recovery plan works its way through the courts, there is plenty of work to do on the ground. Wildlands Network hopes to play a key role in these ongoing efforts by working with the Forest Service to design management strategies for public lands that will give Mexican wolves a better shot at recovery. Photo: Jim Clark, USFWS

Standing behind a fall tree trunk, a gray wolf looks toward the camera.

Wildlands Network and Other Conservationists Intend to File Lawsuit to Protect Mexican Wolves

Because the USFWS’s final Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, released last November, is not enough to ensure the recovery of the Mexican wolf, Wildlands Network gave the USFWS notice last year that we intended to file a lawsuit challenging the plan’s unscientific recommendations. The first piece of that lawsuit will be filed next week. Photo: Eric Kilby