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Achieving Shared Goals: New U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan Affirms Wildlands Network’s Conservation Strategy

On April 24, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the final Jaguar Recovery Plan. Many of the recovery actions proposed in the plan reaffirm Wildlands Network’s key strategies for protecting and enhancing jaguar populations in Mexico and the U.S., while also demonstrating the need for continued robust advocacy with government officials to improve and strengthen the official recovery programs. Photo: © milosk50 / Adobe Stock

A group of people stand in a loose circle in a small grassy field surrounded by scrubby trees.

Wildlands Network Hosts Trail Camera Workshop to Make Mexico’s Highway 2 Safer

Several species that call the borderlands region home face an almost insurmountable threat: Mexico’s Highway 2 has taken thousands of lives, both human and animal. With wildlife crossings, we can reduce the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions and potentially save lives, putting us one step closer to a reconnected and rewilded North America. Photo: Myles Traphagen

4 adorable brown and white pups sitting in the grass

New Report Exposes Border Wall Threats to International Wildlife Conservation Efforts

A new report released today by Wildlands Network highlights how 4 wildlife species native to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands are critically imperiled by existing and proposed border wall construction. “Four Species on the Brink” summarizes habitat, population data, and bi-national conservation efforts for Sonoran pronghorn, black bear, jaguar and Mexican wolf. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo

A close-up of a large jaguar walking through the desert under a bright blue sky

Where Jaguars Roam, Revisited

Ever since a photograph of a lone wild jaguar in Arizona reverberated through the conservation community in 1996, wildlife experts in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands have been trying to determine where jaguars may continue to persist—and which corridors they might be using to disperse beyond their known stronghold in central Sonora. Just this month, researchers have made another significant stride in mapping potentially suitable jaguar habitat and corridors in the borderlands region. Photo: Northern Jaguar Project/Naturalia

A large spotted cat walking across rocky ground

Taking the Careful Path to Jaguar Recovery

Wildlands Network recently submitted comments to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) suggesting ways to improve their proposed jaguar recovery plan. The FWS comment deadline comes just 2 weeks after we learned some very exciting news: a new jaguar has been photo-documented in the Dos Cabezas mountains in southern Arizona! Photo: Northern Jaguar Project, Naturalia

Endangered U.S. Jaguars to Get Critical Habitat, Recovery Plan

Endangered U.S. Jaguars to Get Critical Habitat, Recovery Plan TUCSON, Arizona,  – After years of neglect and indifference, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that it will designate critical habitat for endangered jaguars in the United States and develop a jaguar recovery plan. The Service will propose areas for critical habitat designation by Continue reading “Endangered U.S. Jaguars to Get Critical Habitat, Recovery Plan”