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A large brown, four-legged animal with horns crosses a road in a forest as cars wait for it to pass.

Roads and Wildlife: Working to Reduce the Human/Wildlife Conflict

Wildlands Network’s former Landscape Conservationist, Maggie Ernest Johnson, wrote about our growing road ecology efforts in this article, republished in The Delaware Valley Eagle Alliance’s online Nature Newsletter. Maggie detailed our efforts to mitigate wildlife-vehicle collisions across a number of major highways in North America. Photo: Noel Reynolds

A large tan cat walks on a white, pebbly shore near water.

2018 Year in Review: Building Quiet Momentum

From field research to introducing wildlife corridor protections in Congress to creating new collaborative partnerships, we’ve worked harder than ever—sometimes stressed, sometimes angered, and often exhausted—but always resolute and hopeful. We invite you to take a look at this reflection of our work for wildlife and wildlands in 2018. Photo: National Park Service

Five people tend to a bull elk whose face is covered with a green cloth.

Making Roads Safer for Wildlife and People with GPS Elk Collars

Since fitting 3 elk with GPS collars 8 months ago near Great Smoky Mountains National Park, we’ve collared 4 more elk and are continuing to monitor their movements across nearby roadways to potentially reduce dangerous wildlife-vehicle collisions. We’ll use the data from the GPS collars to recommend the best places for wildlife crossings on roadways surrounding the park, protecting both wildlife and people. Photo: Keith Martin

A group of tan and white four-legged animals stand in a line looking at the camera in a yellow, grassy field in front of some mountains in the evening light.

Landmark Legislation to Protect Wildlife Corridors Introduced in the Senate and House

The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act was introduced today by Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). If passed, the Act will be a major victory for wildlife and wildlands across the country, restoring habitat and protecting America’s native wildlife by establishing a National Wildlife Corridors Program. Photo: Chip Carroon, BLM

In this closeup shot, a red wolf stares straight at the camera, his ears alert and snout pointed downward.

Judge Rules in Favor of Red Wolves, But the Fight Continues

Recent news, including a court ruling against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s mismanagement of wild red wolves and a comment counting effort that showed near unanimous support of red wolf recovery, shows the immense red wolf favor that exists in North Carolina’s swampy Albemarle Peninsula. But these small victories are not the end of the battle for the red wolf. Photo: Becky Bartell, USFWS

Two red wolves, one in front of the other, stand on a patch of dirt surrounded by greenery.

Analysis: Public Overwhelmingly Opposes Feds’ Plan to Nearly Wipe Out Wild Red Wolves in North Carolina

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s proposal to remove protections from the nation’s only wild population of endangered red wolves has been met with near unanimous opposition from the public. Nearly 99.9 percent of comments submitted favored the need for strong federal protections for red wolves. Photo: Ron Sutherland