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Working with Landowners to Advocate for Red Wolves

After conducting listening sessions in the five counties of the red wolf recovery area, we’re working with local landowners to place cameras on their properties to capture images of wildlife, including black bears and red wolves. We hope that by educating people about native wildlife such as bears, wolves, and coyotes, we aim to amend any misconceptions that may surround these ecologically important species. Photo: Wildlands Network

People Are Helping Animals Cross Highways—And That’s Great for Humans, Too

Chief Scientist Dr. Ron Sutherland spoke with Nation Swell, a digital outlet focused on solutions to problems facing the U.S., about the critical importance of wildlife crossings and our work to establish and protect wildlife crossings through policy at the state and federal levels, with a shout out to the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act that was introduced in May. Photo: Oxana / Adobe Stock

Five pig-like animals cross a road with trees, canyons, and hills in the background.

Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019 Introduced in Congress With Bi-Partisan Support Following UN Report On Global Biodiversity Crisis

Marking the most significant step toward national wildlife conservation in decades, the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019 was introduced today in both houses of Congress. Led by Sen. Tom Udall, the bill was co-sponsored in the Senate by Richard Blumenthal, Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Jeff Merkley, Bernie Sanders, Jon Tester, Sheldon Whitehouse, and Ron Wyden. The bill was introduced in the House of Representatives by Congressmen Don Beyer and Vern Buchanan.

Studying Elk Movements in Southern Appalachia

On April 11th, we completed the deployment of our 11 elk GPS collars with wildlife biologist Justin McVey and other North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission staff. We will use the elk’s movement data from the GPS collars to identify road crossing locations and the impacts of roads on elk movement to improve wildlife connectivity and human safety in southern Appalachia. Photo: Liz Hillard

Close-up of gray, white, and tan dog-like animal with tongue hanging out.

There Was Actually a Study to Determine If Red Wolves Are Wolves. The Answer Could Have Doomed Them.

The Washington Post quoted Dr. Ron Sutherland on the recently released report that classified red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves qualify for protections under the Endangered Species Act. We are hopeful this report will motivate the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reinvigorate their red wolf recovery efforts. Photo: USFWS

Red wolf walking towards the photographer with tongue hanging out.

Endangered Red Wolves Are a Distinct Species in Northeastern North Carolina, According to New Study

The Virginian-Pilot covered our response to the newly released wolf taxonomy report, which declared red wolves to be a genetically distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves deserve protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Steve Hillebrand, USFWS

Government-Funded Study Says Red Wolves Are Distinct Species

Dr. Ron Sutherland, our chief scientist, spoke with the Washington Post about the newly released expert report that defines red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. This conclusion is especially important because it means that as a distinct species, red wolves are deserving of protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Ron Sutherland