Section Menu
Small wild canid with pointy ears and fuzzy tan coat

No Harm Done

Published in our Summer 1993 issue of Wild Earth Journal, Mollie Matteson’s haunting essay on the perils of extreme interference with the natural world paints a dark picture of a possible future with unexpected, insidious consequences. Photo: William C. Gladish

Green trees cover the foreground while five mountain peaks rise up behind them and stretch across the frame. The mountains don't have any snow on their peaks, and blue sky with white fluffy clouds stretches behind them.

Reconnecting the Eastern Wildway

On the East Coast, the challenge we face now is reconnecting the region’s big core forests and wetlands into a network that is more than the sum of its parts, and do so fast enough and smart enough to stay ahead of the second wave of habitat loss due to urbanization marching across many popular parts of the region. Photo: Alexius Horatius

A gray wolf raises its head in the air and howls.

Howl for Wolves with Us!

Join the Pacific Wolf Coalition on Saturday, June 9 for the first ever Howl for Wolves event, a hands-on learning experience to gain a deeper understanding of the gray wolf’s return to Washington, at the University of Washington’s Center for Urban Horticulture. Photo: William C. Gladish

A man stands at the top of a rocky cliff to the right of the frame. Expansive blue sky with swirling white clouds spans above him, while a forested valley sprawls below him.

A New Way of Seeing

In this guest post, author Andrew Wisniewski discusses his experiences at RumbleX this past March, when conservationists and athletes gathered together to experience wildlife corridors through the eyes of animals. Andrew posits that since man can’t seem to leave the natural world to be wild, the work of the conservationist is forever important. Photo: Kristen M. Caldon