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Challenges and Opportunities for Transboundary Conservation in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Lee una versión en español abajo Conserving the shared ecosystems and species of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands depends on understanding who is in charge of managing the land that species need to recover, persist and thrive. Yet we often ignore or are overwhelmed by the land management aspects of conservation, especially in Mexico where ownership and Continue reading “Challenges and Opportunities for Transboundary Conservation in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands”

A gray wolf raises its head in the air and howls.

Trump Administration Proposal to Remove Federal Protection for Gray Wolves is Scientifically and Legally Flawed

The Trump Administration is proposing stripping Endangered Species Act protection for all gray wolves in the lower 48 United States, except for the separately listed Mexican gray wolf. Comments on this proposal from conservation groups point to substantial flaws and omissions in the USFWS’s analysis of the relevant science and their interpretation of various ESA mandates. Photo: William C. Gladish

Achieving Shared Goals: New U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan Affirms Wildlands Network’s Conservation Strategy

On April 24, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the final Jaguar Recovery Plan. Many of the recovery actions proposed in the plan reaffirm Wildlands Network’s key strategies for protecting and enhancing jaguar populations in Mexico and the U.S., while also demonstrating the need for continued robust advocacy with government officials to improve and strengthen the official recovery programs. Photo: © milosk50 / Adobe Stock

Close-up of gray, white, and tan dog-like animal with tongue hanging out.

There Was Actually a Study to Determine If Red Wolves Are Wolves. The Answer Could Have Doomed Them.

The Washington Post quoted Dr. Ron Sutherland on the recently released report that classified red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves qualify for protections under the Endangered Species Act. We are hopeful this report will motivate the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reinvigorate their red wolf recovery efforts. Photo: USFWS

Red wolf walking towards the photographer with tongue hanging out.

Endangered Red Wolves Are a Distinct Species in Northeastern North Carolina, According to New Study

The Virginian-Pilot covered our response to the newly released wolf taxonomy report, which declared red wolves to be a genetically distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves deserve protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Steve Hillebrand, USFWS

Government-Funded Study Says Red Wolves Are Distinct Species

Dr. Ron Sutherland, our chief scientist, spoke with the Washington Post about the newly released expert report that defines red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. This conclusion is especially important because it means that as a distinct species, red wolves are deserving of protections under the Endangered Species Act. Photo: Ron Sutherland

A gray wolf raises its head in the air and howls.

Wildlands Network Responds to Trump Administration’s Plan to Prematurely End Protections for Gray Wolves in Lower 48

In response to today’s announcement that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service intends to remove Endangered Species Act protections for most gray wolves in the lower 48 states, Wildlands Network’s senior carnivore advocate Kim Crumbo condemned the move as premature and not based on sound science. Photo: William C. Gladish