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We Wall Ourselves Off: Response to Pentagon Allocating $1 billion for Border Fencing

On Tuesday, the Department of Defense, in response to a directive issued by President Trump, announced that it was transferring $1 billion U.S. dollars to build Trump’s unnecessary and destructive border wall.Wildlands Network strongly opposes the construction of a border wall. The building of such a structure in southern Arizona and New Mexico would be an ecological disaster with far reaching implications. Photo: Tom Koerner, USFWS

Organizaciones de conservación se reúnen para mejorar la protección de la vida silvestre en Estados Unidos y México

El mes pasado, unos 40 líderes de conservación de la vida silvestre de Estados Unidos y México formaron la Colaboración para la Conservación de los Estados Fronterizos, un grupo de trabajo informal dedicado a preservar la conectividad y la biodiversidad única de las tierras fronterizas. Foto: Cortesía Colaboración para la Conservación de los Estados Fronterizos

Conservation Organizations Gathered to Discuss Enhanced Wildlife Protections in the U.S.-Mexico Border States

Last month, some 40 wildlife conservation leaders from both the United States and Mexico formed the Border States Conservation Collaborative, an informal working group dedicated to preserving the connectivity and unique biodiversity of the borderlands. Photo: Courtesy Border States Conservation Collaborative

Lone pronghorn walking through a meadow of yellow flowers

The Environmental Cost of Trump’s Border Wall

Our own Katie Davis was featured in this podcast from the Center for Western Priorities. During the discussion with fellow conservationists Bryan Bird of Defenders of Wildlife and Kirin Kennedy of the Sierra Club, Katie highlights Wildlands Network’s recent border connectivity report, Four Species on the Brink, and the negative environmental impacts of the border wall. Photo: Tom Koerner, USFWS

A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

Trump Administration Finalizes Deeply Flawed Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalized a deeply flawed recovery plan for the Mexican gray wolf. Responding to objections from state officials, the plan limits recovery efforts to south of Interstate 40 and sets population targets well below what federal scientists have determined are needed for Mexican gray wolves to be considered stable. Photo: Gary Kramer