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Lobo Survival Depends on Wolf Family Releases

Action Alert: More Wolves – Less Politics Campaign

Tell US Fish and Wildlife Service to stop playing politics with the lobo’s survival.

For far too long, the Service has allowed anti-wolf politics to drive Mexican wolves towards extinction.

40 years after being listed under the Endangered Species Act, Mexican gray wolves, or “lobos\” are the most endangered gray wolf in the world, with only 97 in the wild according to the last official population count. This is a 12% decrease from the count done in 2015.

Instead of doing what’s needed to ensure the survival of these special wolves, the Fish and Wildlife Service has consistently given in to political pressure from anti-wolf special interests, keeping the lobo at the brink of extinction.

The Fish and Wildlife Service has never released enough wolves from captivity, not only impeding a steady increase in the lobos’ numbers but also triggering a continual loss of genetic diversity in the wild lobo population, resulting in smaller litters, lower pup survival and the population is less able to adapt over time to changing conditions.

A captive breeding program was established for the lobo in the 1980s. The captive population still has genes not represented in the wild population. Therefore, releases from this population would help increase the genetic diversity in the wild population.

Time is running out for the Mexican gray wolf. The Fish and Wildlife Service must immediately release families of wolves from captivity to beat the clock of lobo extinction.

MWLP_infographic_mxwolvesorg

A draft plan with recovery criteria for the Mexican gray wolf was written in 2011 by a team of the nation’s top wolf scientists, who were appointed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to the Mexican wolf recovery plan Science and Planning subgroup.

But instead of moving forward with the scientists’ draft plan, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has allowed political interference to stall the recovery planning process and undermine the science.

Why? Because the four states containing habitat that is necessary for the Mexican wolf to achieve recovery are politically opposed to the scientists’ recommendations, which include two new populations of wolves north of Interstate 40, increased numbers of wolves, and reduced human-caused wolf mortality.

Instead of moving forward with the science based recommendations from recognized wolf experts and the recovery planning team established over four years ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now holding closed door meetings to discuss the Mexican wolf recovery plan with representatives from Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah who have repeatedly demonstrated their opposition to wolves.

Tell US Fish and Wildlife Service that lobos need improved genetics and a science-based recovery plan!

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