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A group of people stand in a loose circle in a small grassy field surrounded by scrubby trees.

Wildlands Network Hosts Trail Camera Workshop to Make Mexico’s Highway 2 Safer

Several species that call the borderlands region home face an almost insurmountable threat: Mexico’s Highway 2 has taken thousands of lives, both human and animal. With wildlife crossings, we can reduce the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions and potentially save lives, putting us one step closer to a reconnected and rewilded North America. Photo: Myles Traphagen

A snowy mountain rises above a lake and is reflected in the water below. Rocky outcrops jut into the water in the foreground.

Places of the Pacific: The Enchantments

Our new Pacific Wildway aims to protect special recreation spaces from British Columbia to Baja California, for both people and wildlife to enjoy. In this new blog post series about recreating in the Pacific Wildway, learn more about a landscape that feels like it belongs to another time and place, with pristine lakes and tarns, jagged peaks, cirques and glaciers. Welcome to the Enchantments. Photo: Richard Forbes

A four-legged wolf-like animal looks back over its shoulder toward the camera in a middle of a field of tall, yellow grasses.

Managing Coyotes for Coexistence

Instead of encouraging coexistence, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission’s final coyote management plan emphasizes lethal management methods. The hunting and trapping-heavy plan is now the state’s official modus operandi. Photo: Melissa McGaw, NCWRC

A small greenish gray fish slides on its belly along a pebbly underwater surface.

Species of the Pacific: Bull Trout

In this final post in our series of blog posts profiling Pacific Northwest species, we present to you the bull trout. Like most species that bear the yoke of climate change most acutely, the bull trout faces a combination of persistent threats rather than one major threat. The widespread warming of streams due to human development and climate change is at odds with the bull trout’s conditions for survival. Photo: Shannon Downey, USFWS

A brown, black and white wolf runs across the frame, toward the left of the frame. The wolf's front paws are off the ground and his tongue is out. He's running on dry scrubby ground.

Managing Public Lands to Restore the Mexican Wolf

While our lawsuit against the USFWS for their flawed Mexican wolf recovery plan works its way through the courts, there is plenty of work to do on the ground. Wildlands Network hopes to play a key role in these ongoing efforts by working with the Forest Service to design management strategies for public lands that will give Mexican wolves a better shot at recovery. Photo: Jim Clark, USFWS