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Achieving Shared Goals: New U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan Affirms Wildlands Network’s Conservation Strategy

On April 24, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the final Jaguar Recovery Plan. Many of the recovery actions proposed in the plan reaffirm Wildlands Network’s key strategies for protecting and enhancing jaguar populations in Mexico and the U.S., while also demonstrating the need for continued robust advocacy with government officials to improve and strengthen the official recovery programs. Photo: © milosk50 / Adobe Stock

Can We Preserve the Grand Canyon’s History and Wilderness for the Next 10,000 Years?

After a thrilling rafting trip down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, Rebecca Hunter wrote about her journey through one of America’s most prized national treasures. At Wildlands Network, large protected areas like Grand Canyon National Park and other public lands form the building blocks of our Wildways, and it’s imperative that we continue to protect such regions, now and into the future. Photo: Richard Forbes

We Wall Ourselves Off: Response to Pentagon Allocating $1 billion for Border Fencing

On Tuesday, the Department of Defense, in response to a directive issued by President Trump, announced that it was transferring $1 billion U.S. dollars to build Trump’s unnecessary and destructive border wall.Wildlands Network strongly opposes the construction of a border wall. The building of such a structure in southern Arizona and New Mexico would be an ecological disaster with far reaching implications. Photo: Tom Koerner, USFWS

Native Grasses of the Apache Highlands: An Interview with Artist Matilda Essig

In the world of conservation, grasslands usually take a back seat to mountains and forests. But at the Tucson International Airport, grasses take center stage in larger-than-life prints in artist Matilda Essig’s exhibit. Our borderlands coordinator, Myles Traphagen, sat down with Matilda for an interview on the critical role grasses play in healthy ecosystems. Photo: Myles Traphagen

Un vistazo de vida silvestre en movimiento

La Carretera 2 de México podría crear una barrera geográfica casi impasable para la vida silvestre que trata de cruzarla para encontrar comida, compañeros y refugio. Leer más sobre la captura de cámaras que estamos realizando en esta área para hacer recomendaciones basadas en datos para cruces de vida silvestre a lo largo de la carretera. Foto: Wildlands Network/EcoGrande/Sky Island Alliance

A large tan cat walks on a white, pebbly shore near water.

2018 Year in Review: Building Quiet Momentum

From field research to introducing wildlife corridor protections in Congress to creating new collaborative partnerships, we’ve worked harder than ever—sometimes stressed, sometimes angered, and often exhausted—but always resolute and hopeful. We invite you to take a look at this reflection of our work for wildlife and wildlands in 2018. Photo: National Park Service

Five people tend to a bull elk whose face is covered with a green cloth.

Making Roads Safer for Wildlife and People with GPS Elk Collars

Since fitting 3 elk with GPS collars 8 months ago near Great Smoky Mountains National Park, we’ve collared 4 more elk and are continuing to monitor their movements across nearby roadways to potentially reduce dangerous wildlife-vehicle collisions. We’ll use the data from the GPS collars to recommend the best places for wildlife crossings on roadways surrounding the park, protecting both wildlife and people. Photo: Keith Martin

In this closeup shot, a red wolf stares straight at the camera, his ears alert and snout pointed downward.

Judge Rules in Favor of Red Wolves, But the Fight Continues

Recent news, including a court ruling against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s mismanagement of wild red wolves and a comment counting effort that showed near unanimous support of red wolf recovery, shows the immense red wolf favor that exists in North Carolina’s swampy Albemarle Peninsula. But these small victories are not the end of the battle for the red wolf. Photo: Becky Bartell, USFWS