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A man with a hip bag hugs a large loblolly tree's trunk with smaller trees in the background.

How to Preserve Nature While Hiking

There’s no better way to get a little vacation from the stresses of your everyday routine than to go for a hike, especially along such scenic trails as the Appalachian Trail. However, lots of people going out to hike can end up taking a big toll on the environment. Here are a few tips to help protect the environment. Photo: John Davis

Working with Landowners to Advocate for Red Wolves

After conducting listening sessions in the five counties of the red wolf recovery area, we’re working with local landowners to place cameras on their properties to capture images of wildlife, including black bears and red wolves. We hope that by educating people about native wildlife such as bears, wolves, and coyotes, we aim to amend any misconceptions that may surround these ecologically important species. Photo: Wildlands Network

Marine Matters #1: Penny Becker is Advancing Policy to Protect Southern Resident Orcas

Ocean life is an indelible part of the natural heritage of our Pacific states, but unfortunately, critical marine habitats are fragmented and degraded. In this first post in a new blog post series on the importance of marine life, we spoke with Penny Becker, Conservation Policy Lead at Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, about the critical work she and WDFW are doing to protect threatened marine animals like Southern Resident orcas. Photo: Penny Becker

Jaguarundi: Benefitting from Binational Connectivity

Continuing our series on wildlife profiles, we’re highlighting the mysterious jaguarundi, a small wild cat who’s all but disappeared from the landscape. Learn more about how Wildlands Networks efforts to reconnect, restore, and rewild North America, especially in the borderlands, will help the jaguarundi thrive. Photo: © Katerina Mirus / Adobe Stock

The Red Fox: Connectivity for Cunning Creatures

In this second blog post in a new series of wildlife profiles, we’re exploring the cunning red fox, one subspecies of which is in danger of disappearing from the American landscape forever. Read on to learn more about how Wildlands Network’s efforts to reestablish habitat connectivity across North America can benefit species like the red fox. Photo: Lisa Hupp, USFWS

Studying Elk Movements in Southern Appalachia

On April 11th, we completed the deployment of our 11 elk GPS collars with wildlife biologist Justin McVey and other North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission staff. We will use the elk’s movement data from the GPS collars to identify road crossing locations and the impacts of roads on elk movement to improve wildlife connectivity and human safety in southern Appalachia. Photo: Liz Hillard

Achieving Shared Goals: New U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan Affirms Wildlands Network’s Conservation Strategy

On April 24, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the final Jaguar Recovery Plan. Many of the recovery actions proposed in the plan reaffirm Wildlands Network’s key strategies for protecting and enhancing jaguar populations in Mexico and the U.S., while also demonstrating the need for continued robust advocacy with government officials to improve and strengthen the official recovery programs. Photo: © milosk50 / Adobe Stock

Can We Preserve the Grand Canyon’s History and Wilderness for the Next 10,000 Years?

After a thrilling rafting trip down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, Rebecca Hunter wrote about her journey through one of America’s most prized national treasures. At Wildlands Network, large protected areas like Grand Canyon National Park and other public lands form the building blocks of our Wildways, and it’s imperative that we continue to protect such regions, now and into the future. Photo: Richard Forbes

We Wall Ourselves Off: Response to Pentagon Allocating $1 billion for Border Fencing

On Tuesday, the Department of Defense, in response to a directive issued by President Trump, announced that it was transferring $1 billion U.S. dollars to build Trump’s unnecessary and destructive border wall.Wildlands Network strongly opposes the construction of a border wall. The building of such a structure in southern Arizona and New Mexico would be an ecological disaster with far reaching implications. Photo: Tom Koerner, USFWS

Native Grasses of the Apache Highlands: An Interview with Artist Matilda Essig

In the world of conservation, grasslands usually take a back seat to mountains and forests. But at the Tucson International Airport, grasses take center stage in larger-than-life prints in artist Matilda Essig’s exhibit. Our borderlands coordinator, Myles Traphagen, sat down with Matilda for an interview on the critical role grasses play in healthy ecosystems. Photo: Myles Traphagen

Un vistazo de vida silvestre en movimiento

La Carretera 2 de México podría crear una barrera geográfica casi impasable para la vida silvestre que trata de cruzarla para encontrar comida, compañeros y refugio. Leer más sobre la captura de cámaras que estamos realizando en esta área para hacer recomendaciones basadas en datos para cruces de vida silvestre a lo largo de la carretera. Foto: Wildlands Network/EcoGrande/Sky Island Alliance