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A gray wolf raises its head in the air and howls.

Trump Administration Proposal to Remove Federal Protection for Gray Wolves is Scientifically and Legally Flawed

The Trump Administration is proposing stripping Endangered Species Act protection for all gray wolves in the lower 48 United States, except for the separately listed Mexican gray wolf. Comments on this proposal from conservation groups point to substantial flaws and omissions in the USFWS’s analysis of the relevant science and their interpretation of various ESA mandates. Photo: William C. Gladish

A large brown, four-legged animal with horns crosses a road in a forest as cars wait for it to pass.

New State Law Aims to Curb Car-Wildlife Crashes

KTVZ, a local news outlet in central Oregon, covered our press release about the passage of a new bill in Oregon that will map and protect wildlife crossings. The bill requires the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to map wildlife corridors and work with ODOT and other state agencies to protect them, for example, by incorporating wildlife crossings in new development projects. Photo: Noel Reynolds

People Are Helping Animals Cross Highways—And That’s Great for Humans, Too

Chief Scientist Dr. Ron Sutherland spoke with Nation Swell, a digital outlet focused on solutions to problems facing the U.S., about the critical importance of wildlife crossings and our work to establish and protect wildlife crossings through policy at the state and federal levels, with a shout out to the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act that was introduced in May. Photo: Oxana / Adobe Stock

A small, fuzzy bear with black fur is pictured peering out from behind a tree branch.

Dead Bears on the Highway

Both Dr. Liz Hillard, wildlife scientist, and Dr. Ron Sutherland, chief scientist, were featured in this article about bear collisions with vehicles near Great Smoky Mountains National Park, where we are conducting GPS collaring studies to monitor wildlife movement across roads. Photo: William C. Gladish

A large tan cat walks on a white, pebbly shore near water.

Bipartisan Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019 Introduced Following UN Report on Global Biodiversity Crisis

The Sierra Sun Times picked up our press release about the introduction of the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019. If passed, the Act will restore habitat and protect America’s native wildlife by establishing a National Wildlife Corridors Program that facilitates the designation of wildlife corridors on federal lands and provides grants to maintain wildlife corridors on non-federal lands. Photo: National Park Service

A group of tan and white four-legged animals stand in a line looking at the camera in a yellow, grassy field in front of some mountains in the evening light.

Wildlife: Bill Seeks to Enhance Healthy Migration Paths for Species

E&E, an outlet focused on energy and the environment, covered the introduction of the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019, which if passed, will restore habitat and protect America’s native wildlife—including pronghorns, monarch butterflies, Florida panthers, and grizzly bears—by establishing a National Wildlife Corridors Program. Photo: Chip Carroon, BLM

A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

Annual Mexican Wolf Count Shows Hope for the Species, but More Still Needs to Be Done

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (FWS) service reported earlier today that the Mexican gray wolf population had increased from 114 individuals in 2018 to 131 individuals in 2019. Kim Crumbo, Senior Carnivore Advocate for Wildlands Network, said that while the increase is good news, there is still much to be done to recover the endangered Mexican wolf to sustainable population levels. Wildlands Network encourages FWS to act upon the best available science for this species. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo

Close-up of gray, white, and tan dog-like animal with tongue hanging out.

There Was Actually a Study to Determine If Red Wolves Are Wolves. The Answer Could Have Doomed Them.

The Washington Post quoted Dr. Ron Sutherland on the recently released report that classified red wolves as a distinct species, separate from gray wolves and coyotes. As a distinct species, red wolves qualify for protections under the Endangered Species Act. We are hopeful this report will motivate the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reinvigorate their red wolf recovery efforts. Photo: USFWS