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Five pig-like animals cross a road with trees, canyons, and hills in the background.

Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019 Introduced in Congress With Bi-Partisan Support Following UN Report On Global Biodiversity Crisis

Marking the most significant step toward national wildlife conservation in decades, the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019 was introduced today in both houses of Congress. Led by Sen. Tom Udall, the bill was co-sponsored in the Senate by Richard Blumenthal, Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Jeff Merkley, Bernie Sanders, Jon Tester, Sheldon Whitehouse, and Ron Wyden. The bill was introduced in the House of Representatives by Congressmen Don Beyer and Vern Buchanan.

The Red Fox: Connectivity for Cunning Creatures

In this second blog post in a new series of wildlife profiles, we’re exploring the cunning red fox, one subspecies of which is in danger of disappearing from the American landscape forever. Read on to learn more about how Wildlands Network’s efforts to reestablish habitat connectivity across North America can benefit species like the red fox. Photo: Lisa Hupp, USFWS

Achieving Shared Goals: New U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan Affirms Wildlands Network’s Conservation Strategy

On April 24, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the final Jaguar Recovery Plan. Many of the recovery actions proposed in the plan reaffirm Wildlands Network’s key strategies for protecting and enhancing jaguar populations in Mexico and the U.S., while also demonstrating the need for continued robust advocacy with government officials to improve and strengthen the official recovery programs. Photo: © milosk50 / Adobe Stock

American Martens Can Thrive in Protected and Connected Habitats

In this first blog post in a new series, we’re taking a closer look at American martens, who are integral in developing well-balanced forest communities and will greatly benefit from connected and protected habitats. Wildlands Network is actively working to increase habitat connectivity for this special creature in regions like the Pacific. Photo: Erwin and Peggy Bauer

A lone Mexican wolf moves through green vegetation, with the photo blurred to show that the wolf is in motion.

Annual Mexican Wolf Count Shows Hope for the Species, but More Still Needs to Be Done

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (FWS) service reported earlier today that the Mexican gray wolf population had increased from 114 individuals in 2018 to 131 individuals in 2019. Kim Crumbo, Senior Carnivore Advocate for Wildlands Network, said that while the increase is good news, there is still much to be done to recover the endangered Mexican wolf to sustainable population levels. Wildlands Network encourages FWS to act upon the best available science for this species. Photo: Juan Carlos Bravo